Smart Transport

East Midlands reveals £2.7 billion HS2 station plans

A group of councils, transport bodies and East Midlands Airport have published a £2.7 billion plan for a HS2 transport hub station south of Nottingham.

The plan includes new and improved rail, bus, and tram networks, plus enhanced road infrastructure.

HS2 is the high speed railway linking up London, the Midlands and the North, serving eight of Britain’s 10 largest cities. The DfT gave the greenlight for £12bn worth of design and construction work to begin in April.

Under the proposals over 20 villages, towns, and cities across the East Midlands will have direct access to the HS2 station, including Leicester, Nottingham, Derby, Newark, Matlock, Mansfield and Long Eaton.

The vision is split into three phases, with the first earmarked for completion by 2030, to stimulate development before HS2 trains first arrive in the East Midlands.

Toton Hub Station

Phase One of the scheme, which could be implemented and operational within the next 10 years includes plans for:

  • An extension of the Nottingham Tram system from Long Eaton to Toton Lane via two new stops at the planned Innovation Campus Development and HS2 East Midlands Hub
  • New bus services from the HS2 East Midlands Hub to Amber Valley, West Bridgford, and Clifton;
  • Four rail services per hour to the HS2 East Midlands Hub from Leicester, Derby, and Nottingham;
  • Enhanced road access to the HS2 East Midlands Hub via improvements to the A6005; and
  • New rail services between Mansfield, Derby and Leicester, with stops at Ilkeston, Langley Mill, Kirkby in Ashfield, Sutton Parkway and the HS2 East Midlands Hub, made possible by reopening the Maid Marian line to passenger services.

Phase Two of the scheme, which could be up and running within 20 years, includes a new railway station at East Midlands Airport and connections from the East Midlands Hub to Derby by tram or Bus Rapid Transit.

The new station at East Midlands Airport would allow a direct journey to Leicester in 15 minutes, to Derby in 18 minutes and to Nottingham in 26 minutes.

The final raft of improvements in Phase Three, which would be completed within 25 years, include new rail links to the South Derby Growth Zone and Rolls Royce site, as well as a tram-train serving Long Eaton, a planned housing development to the west of East Midlands Airport, Ratcliffe-on-Soar-Power Station, and the East Midlands Gateway logistics site.

Elizabeth Fagan, chair of the D2N2 (the Local Enterprise Partnership for Derby, Derbyshire, Nottingham and Nottinghamshire), said:  "This is not just a transport plan; it's a blueprint for social mobility, prosperity and long-term economic growth.

“Having the right infrastructure in place will be a catalyst for regeneration, job creation and homebuilding.

“Now is the time for us all to work together to secure investment and the commitment to make the most of the high-speed rail network to ensure we deliver a successful future post-COVID-19."

D2N2 is now seeking an initial £4.5 million in funding from the Government to allow Phase One of the scheme to be brought forward to the next stage of development, including the production of more detailed project designs, engineering solutions and costings.

A Business Case for the Access to the HS2 East Midlands Hub project was funded by local partners and submitted to the Department for Transport in spring 2020.

The findings will be submitted as evidence to the National Infrastructure Commission’s Rail Needs Assessment, which will inform the government’s High-Speed North Integrated Rail Plan.

Birmingham City Council has already had its plans approved for its HS2 Curzon Street station.

The plans include a new northern terminal connecting Birmingham to London Euston through Birmingham interchange and Old Oak Common.

Watch now: Connecting Policy To Solutions Virtual Conference 2021

Smart Transport Conference returned on June 8th & 9th, to facilitate pivotal discussions on the future of transport. 

The UK’s most senior public and private sector transport leaders discussed the impact of Covid-19, achieving the Government’s decarbonisation ambitions, the need for more efficient living and better health, and much more.

Keynote speakers included: 

Kwasi Kwarteng, secretary of state at the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), who spoke on BEIS's approach to decarbonising transport, particularly the electrification of the vehicle industry

Keith Williams, co-author of the Williams-Shapps Plan for Rail, who spoke on rail’s role in integrated transport, decarbonisation and innovation.

Rachel Maclean, parliamentary under-secretary of state at the Department for Transport, who discussed the future of transport and its pivotal role in a ‘green recovery’ from the pandemic.

 

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